Exercise 2.6

Use a combination of wide apertures, long focal lengths and close viewpoints to take a number of photographs with shallow depth of field. (Remember that smaller f numbers mean wider apertures.) Try to compose the out-of-focus parts of the picture together with the main subject. Add one or two unedited sequences, together with relevant shooting data and an indication of your selects, to your learning log.

Books f4 unedited

f4.0 @ 1/80sec, ISO 100, FL 80mm

Books f22 unedited

 

f22@0.3 sec, ISO 100, FL 80mm

Using the smallest aperture for my Canon 24-105mm lens and using AV (aperture priority) setting with a focal length of 80mm, the depth of field is very narrow with only the title of the main book clearly visible.  The shutter speed is the fastest of the three images published here at 1/80 sec.  By increasing the size of the aperture to f16 the shutter speed slows to 1/6 sec and the depth of field is increased.  In this image we can now see more of the title of the main book and can begin to pick out the titles of the books in the background.  When the shutter is set to f22 (the smallest aperture) the shutter speed is significantly slower at 0.3 sec., however the depth of field is increasing with the authors name now visible but the titles of the books in the background remain blurred.  The difference in depth of field between an aperture of f16 and f22 is not as significant as between f4.0 and f16.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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